Client Resources

What Should I do if ICE Detains my Loved One in Southern California?

How do I find out where my loved one is?


If your loved one is less than 18 years old and you are their parent or guardian, call the Office of Refugee Resettlement National Call Center at 1-800-203-7001 to locate your child. If your loved one is 18 years old or older:

  1. Check ICE’s Online Detainee Locator System: https://locator.ice.gov/odls/#/index.
    • To use the system, you must have either
      • your loved one’s Alien registration (A) number and birth country or...
      • your loved one’s complete name, birth country, and birthday.
  2. The system won’t work if:
    • Your loved one is under 18.
    • You do not have all the required information.
    • Your loved one was just detained. Your loved one’s information might not appear in the system for several days.
  3. If you can’t locate your loved one through ICE’s Online Detainee Locator System, call ICE’s Los Angeles Field Office: 213-830-7911.
    1. The ICE Los Angeles Field Office will likely only have information about your loved one if your loved one was detained in the following counties
      1. Los Angeles
      2. Orange
      3. Riverside
      4. San Bernardino
      5. Ventura
      6. Santa Barbara
      7. San Luis Obispo
  4. If you loved one calls you, ask them where they are detained.
    1. After being detained, your loved one may get a free phone call. Make sure to ask where they are if they call.




Once I find my loved one, can ICE move them somewhere else?


Yes. ICE usually holds people they detain in a temporary location while they arrange transportation to a long-term detention facility like Adelanto. Even after ICE takes your loved one to a detention facility like Adelanto, ICE might move them to a different detention center later. The best way to find out if ICE has moved your loved one to a different facility is to use ICE’s online detainee locator: https://locator.ice.gov/odls/#/index. This online system takes a few days to update, so you may not be able to find out if ICE moved your loved one immediately.




How can I help my loved one after they are detained?


  1. Start looking for a lawyer.
    • Try to find a lawyer as soon as you can. See our handout called “Finding a Lawyer and Other Resources” for more information on finding a lawyer in and around Los Angeles.
  2. If your loved one calls you, tell them to ask ICE to release them.
    • ICE has the authority to release some people on a bond. ICE can also release people “on recognizance,” which means ICE can release them without paying a bond. If ICE agrees to release your loved one on bond, pay the bond as soon as you are because ICE can take back the option to pay bond at any time.
    • You can find instructions on how to pay bond in and around Los Angeles in our handout called “How to Pay Bond in Los Angeles.”
  3. Add money to your loved one’s phone account.
    • Once you have located your loved one, you can add money to their phone account so they can communicate with you and others while they are detained.
    • We have instructions on adding money to a phone account at the Adelanto Detention Facility in our handout called “How to Support My Loved One Who Is Detained at the Adelanto Detention Facility.” If your loved one is detained somewhere else, call that facility to find out how to add money to a phone account.





How Can I Support My Loved One Who Is Detained at the Adelanto Detention Facility?

Visits


Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, in-person visitation is not currently allowed at Adelanto Detention Facility. When visitation is allowed again, keep the following in mind:

  1. Every housing unit has different visitation days and hours.
  2. You do not need to make an appointment to visit.
  3. You must arrive before 6:30 pm.
  4. Only three people can visit a detained person at one time, and visits are limited to one hour.
  5. Each detained person is only allowed one visit from friends and family each day.
  6. When you arrive, check in with the front desk. Each person visiting must have a United States ID or foreign passport with a valid visa.
    • If you do not have lawful status in the United States, going to the Adelanto Detention Facility could put you at risk of being detained or deported by ICE.
  7. You cannot take anything with you to the visitation area.
    • You can leave your belongings in a locker in the lobby. The front desk will give you a locker key.
    • Firearms and weapons are not allowed in the facility.
  8. To visit your loved one, you will pass through a metal detector and may be searched by a facility official.
  9. Minors must be accompanied by an adult guardian.
  10. Dress code.
    • No short shorts or skirts with high slits.
    • No leggings or overly tight pants.
    • No basketball shorts.
    • No see-through clothing or pants with holes.
    • No hats or beanies. Religious head coverings are allowed.
    • No open-toed shoes.
    • No hoodies.
    • No spaghetti strap shirts.




Find Others Who Can Visit


Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, in-person visitation is not currently allowed. However, before the pandemic, several groups visited people detained at Adelanto. If your loved one would like visits from community members once visitation is allowed again, contact:

  1. Adelanto Visitation Network: (310) 310-0790
  2. Friends of Orange County Detainees: (949) 682-5053




Deposit Money in Your Loved One’s Account for Phone Calls and Commissary


There are three ways to send money to your loved one. Your loved one can use this money for phone calls or commissary.

  1. Mail a check or money order to:
    • Loved One’s Name Last 4 digits of A Number, Housing Unit/Dorm/Bunk Number
      10250 Rancho Road
      Adelanto, CA 92301
    • The person who reviews the mail at Adelanto will deposit the money into your loved one’s account.
  2. Make a deposit online at https://www.accesscorrections.com/#/. The website charges a fee for each deposit you make.
  3. Make a deposit in the kiosk in Adelanto’s lobby. The kiosk accepts cash, credit cards, and debit cards.




Send Letters, Documents, or Books


Letters, documents, and books are the only things your loved one can receive from you. Anything else you send will be put in your loved one’s property box, and they will only be able to access it when they are released from detention or deported.

  1. Letters and Documents
    • You can send mail to your loved one. ICE will inspect all mail. Letters should be addressed to:
      • Detainee Name
        Last 4 digits of A Number, Housing Unit/Dorm/Bunk Number
        10250 Rancho Road
        Adelanto, CA 92301
  2. Books
    • There are two ways to send books to your loved ones:
      • Amazon
      • Directly from the author
      • Use the mailing address above. Once your loved one receives the book, they will be able to read it first, but they cannot keep it. It will become the dorm’s property after your loved one is finished with it.




Pick Up Your Loved One If ICE Releases Them


If your loved one is going to be released from Adelanto, ICE will probably release them between 7 and 9 pm. If no one can pick your loved one up, the Adelanto Visitation Network may be able to give your loved one a ride. Their phone numbers are (310) 310-0790; (360) 521-4096; and (510) 589-6820.




Send Baggage if Your Loved One Will Be Deported


If your loved one will be deported, you can mail them a small bag (less than 40 pounds) to take with them. The bag cannot contain electronic devices like cell phones, electric razors, laptops, or radios. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, you cannot personally deliver bags to Adelanto right now. Before mailing the bag, call Adelanto at (760) 561-6100. Ask to speak to your loved one’s Deportation Office who can give you more instructions about mailing the bag.





Attending Hearings at the Adelanto Detention Facility (Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, you cannot attend immigration hearings at Adelanto unless you are a witness.)

How do I find out when my loved one’s next hearing is?


There are two ways to find out when your loved one’s next hearing is:

  1. Call 1-800-898-7180. You must have your loved one’s A number.
  2. Enter your loved one’s A number at https://portal.eoir.justice.gov/InfoSystem/Form?Language=EN




What time should I arrive?


Arrive early. Before entering the courtroom, you must check in at the front desk and go through security. Lines are often long, so you should arrive at least 30 minutes before the hearing time.




What should I do when I arrive?


When you arrive, check in at the front desk. Each person who wants to attend the hearing must give the front desk a United States ID or foreign passport with a valid visa. If you do not have lawful status in the United States, going to the Adelanto Detention Facility could put you at risk of being detained or deported by ICE. You cannot take any personal items into the courtroom. After checking in, put all your personal items into a locker assigned by the front desk. To enter the court, you will pass through a metal detector and may be searched by a facility official. You must wait in the front lobby or in the court waiting area for your loved one’s hearing to begin. Many hearings are scheduled for the same time, and there is not enough room in the court for everyone’s lawyers, family, and friends. A facility official will call you once your loved one’s hearing is going to begin. The hearing might not begin until several hours after the scheduled hearing time.




Is there a dress code?


Yes:

  • No short shorts or skirts with high slits
  • No leggings or overly tight pants
  • No basketball shorts
  • No see-through clothing or pants with holes
  • No hats or beanies. Religious head coverings are allowed.
  • No open-toed shoes
  • No hoodies
  • No spaghetti strap shirts




Can I visit my loved one after their hearing?


You can visit your loved one after their hearing only if their housing unit is scheduled for visitation after the hearing. To find out your loved one’s visitation schedule, call Adelanto at 760-561-6100 or go to https://www.ice.gov/detention-facility/adelanto-ice-processing-center





Attending Hearings at Los Angeles Immigration Courts - N. Los Angeles Street; Olive Street, Van Nuys Boulevard

How do I find out when my next hearing is?


There are two ways to find out the date and time of your next hearing:

  1. Call 1-800-898-7180. You must have your A number.
  2. Enter your A number at https://portal.eoir.justice.gov/InfoSystem/Form?Language=EN
Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, courts may close temporarily, restrict access to the courtrooms, postpone hearings, or require facial coverings or masks. To check whether the court where you are scheduled is open, and any standing orders for that court, please check the EOIR Operational Status website: https://www.justice.gov/eoir/eoir-operational-status-during-coronavirus-pandemic




What time should I arrive for my hearing?


Arrive early. Parking may take some time, and you must go through security, which often has long lines. If you arrive late to your hearing, a judge could order you deported, so it is very important you give yourself lots of extra time to get to your courtroom.




If my minor child has a hearing in immigration court, are they required to attend?


Yes. Even if your child is under 18 years old, they are required to attend all immigration court hearings, unless the Immigration Judge has specifically waived their presence during a prior hearing. Failure to attend a hearing in immigration court could result in an order of removal against the child. Judges require that all minor children be accompanied by a responsible adult.





What to Expect at the Olive Street Immigration Court

Parking


There is no parking available in the building for the general public. Metered street parking is nearby. Commercial parking lots are within walking distance to the building. Public transportation is available through Metro https://www.metro.net/riding/trip-planner/ and LADOT https://www.ladottransit.com/plantrip.html




Security


When you arrive, you must wait in line to enter the elevators. Your hearing notice will say which floor your courtroom is located on. When you arrive on your courtroom’s floor, you will pass through a metal detector and all your belongings will go through an x-ray machine. You cannot bring food, drink, cameras, video or recording equipment, explosives, firearms, dangerous weapons, or animals (except service animals).




Hearings


If you are scheduled for a master calendar hearing, the judge will have many other hearings scheduled at the same time. This means you might have to wait several hours for your hearing to begin. Friends and family can attend the hearing with you, but if the courtroom is full, you may have to wait outside until the judge calls your case. Do not use your cell phone in the courtroom.





What to Expect at the N. Los Angles Street Immigration Court

Parking


There is no parking available in the building for the general public. Metered street parking is nearby. Commercial parking lots are within walking distance to the building. You can find parking options here. Public transportation is available through Metro and LADOT




Security


When you arrive, you must wait in line outside to pass through security. The line is often long. To pass through security, you must walk through a metal detector and put your personal belongings through an x-ray machine. You cannot bring any cameras, video or recording equipment, explosives, firearms, dangerous weapons, or animals (except service animals).




Hearings


If you are scheduled for a master calendar hearing, the judge will have many other hearings scheduled at the same time. This means you might have to wait several hours for your hearing to begin. Friends and family can accompany you to your hearing.





What to Expect at the Van Nuys Boulevard Immigration Court





Parking


A city public parking facility at 14517 Erwin Street is within walking distance to the building. There is also metered street parking nearby. Public transportation is available through Metro and LADOT.




Security


When you arrive at the building, you must pass through security. The line may be long. You cannot bring knives, pepper spray, guns, or explosives into the building. During the COVID-19 pandemic, you must wear a mask. You may not use your cell phone when you are inside the building.




Hearings


If you are scheduled for a master calendar hearing, the judge will have many other hearings scheduled at the same time. This means you might have to wait several hours for your hearing to begin. Friends and family can accompany you to your hearing. No one may use cell phones inside the building.





How do I pay a bond in Los Angeles?

Where can I pay bond in Los Angeles?


Los Angeles ICE Office 300 N Los Angeles Street Suite 7621 Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 830-7911 Parking There is no parking available in the building for the general public. Metered street parking is nearby. Commercial parking lots are within walking distance to the building. You can find parking options here. Public transportation is available via Metro. Security When you arrive at 300 N. Los Angeles Street, you must wait in line outside to pass through security. The line is often long. To pass through security, you must walk through a metal detector and put your personal belongings through an x-ray machine. You cannot bring any cameras, video or recording equipment, explosives, firearms, dangerous weapons, or animals (except service animals).




Where Can I Pay Bond if I Do Not Live in Los Angeles?


You can pay bond at any ICE office that accepts bond payment. If you do not live near the Los Angeles ICE office, you can find a list of all the ICE offices that accept bond payments here.




When Can I Pay Bond at the Los Angeles ICE Office?


The Los Angeles ICE Office is open Monday through Friday from 6:30 am to 3 pm. You should arrive as early as possible because paying bond takes several hours and if you arrive too late, you will have to return another day to pay.




Who can pay bond?


Any U.S. citizen or Lawful Permanent Resident (LPR) can pay bond. The person who pays bond does not need to be the same person who was the bond sponsor in immigration court. If the bond payment is returned, it will be sent to the person who paid the bond.




What Do I Need to Take with Me to Pay Bond?


  • Your ID
  • A copy of the judge’s order granting bond
  • The full name of the person you are paying bond for and their A number
  • A single cashier’s check or money order from a U.S. post office made out to “Department of Homeland Security.” You cannot pay with cash, a personal check, travelers' checks, or a money order that is not from a U.S. post office.




When and where will my loved one be released?


Adelanto releases people at the facility between 7 and 9 pm on the same day they pay bond. If no one can pick your loved one up, the Adelanto Visitation Network may be able to give your loved one a ride. Their phone numbers are (310) 310-0790; (360) 521-4096; or (510) 589-6820.




Will I get the bond payment back?


If your family member or friend attends all their court hearings and wins their case or leaves the country after being ordered deported, the person who paid bond at an ICE office will be able to request that the government return the bond money to them. If your family member or friend does not attend their hearings or comply with a deportation order, the government will not return the bond payment.




What if I don't have enough money to pay bond?


If you are not able to pay bond, you can seek support from a non-profit organization or a bond company. Non-Profit Organizations Some non-profit organizations help pay bond. However, many people need help paying bond and these organizations cannot help everyone. Here are some organizations you can contact for help paying bond: Freedom for Immigrants 209-757-3733 Clergy & Laity United for Economic Justice (CLUE) 213-481-3740 Orange County Justice Fund 714-340-5469 Immigrant Families Together Bond Companies There are also bond companies who will pay bond. We do not endorse working with any specific bond company because they charge high fees and do not return the entire amount you pay them at the end of the case. However, we understand that sometimes working with a bond company is the only way to get your loved one out of detention. To work with bond companies, you must usually give them 10 to 20% of the total bond amount. In addition, they often charge a monthly fee until you have paid the entire bond amount. The company may require that you or your family have property or other things of value that the company can take and sell to get back its money if your loved one doesn't go to their hearings or leave the country if they are ordered deported. They may also make your loved one wear an ankle monitor. The company may charge a large monthly fee for the ankle monitor, so it is best to avoid this requirement if possible. Each bond company has different requirements, so you should contact them directly to find out which one would be the best for your loved one. A few bond companies you can contact are: Libre By Nexus 888-997-7646 U.S. Immigration Bonds and Services, Inc. 800-225-2587 House of Bail Bonds, Inc. 1-800-944-2249





Finding a Lawyer and Other Services Around Los Angeles

How Can I Find a Free or Low-cost Lawyer?


There are several non-profit organizations that provide or can help you find free or low-cost legal representation in the greater Los Angeles area: Los Angeles

  • Immigrant Defenders Law Center (ImmDef): (213) 634-0999
  • Bet Tzedek: (323) 939-0506
  • Esperanza Immigrant Rights Project: (213) 251-3411
  • Central American Resource Center (CARECEN): (213) 385-7800
  • Coalition to Abolish Slavery and Trafficking (CAST): (213) 365-1906
  • Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles (CHIRLA): (213) 353-1333
  • Immigration Center for Women and children (ICWC): (213) 614-1165
  • Kids in Need of Defense (KIND): (213) 896-2515
  • LA Center for Law and Justice: (323) 980-3500 ext. 22
  • LACBA Immigration Assistance Project: (213) 485-1873
  • Levitt and Quinn Family Law Center: (213) 482-1800 ext. 300
  • Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles (LAFLA): (800) 399-4529
  • Long Beach Community Defense Network: (562) 269-1083
  • Long Beach Immigrant Rights Coalition: 562-204-6333
  • Neighborhood Legal Services of Los Angeles County: (818) 834-7531
  • Public Counsel: (213) 385-2977
  • The Immigration Legal Assistance Project: (213) 485-1873; (213) 485-1872
Orange County
  • Immigrant Defenders Law Center (ImmDef): (213) 634-0999
  • Orange County Justice Fund: (714) 340-5469
  • Public Law Center: (714) 541-1010
  • Resilience OC
  • Some of the organizations in Los Angeles also provide services to people in Orange County
Inland Empire
  • Immigrant Defenders Law Center (ImmDef): (213) 634-0999
  • Central American Resource Center (CARECEN): (213) 385-7800
  • Inland Coalition for Immigrant Justice Emergency Response Network: 909-361-4588
  • San Bernardino Community Service Center: (909) 885-1992 
  • Some of the organizations in Los Angeles also provide services to people in the Inland Empire.




How can I find other help?


Call 211. 211 is a hotline that provides information and referrals to many community resources and services. If you have questions about medical care, housing, food, education, mental health, school, or another community resource, call 2-1-1. Los Angeles Office of Immigrant Affairs The Los Angeles Office of Immigrant Affairs made a Community Resource Guide with information about library and school resources, housing and tenant rights, workplace rights, and other topics. You can read the guide here.





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